Judge rules $560M Powerball jackpot victor can remain anonymous

Nellie Chapman
March 13, 2018

The woman, from New Hampshire, had signed her ticket after winning the lottery on 6 January but was later told by lawyers that she could have kept her identity hidden by writing the name of a trust instead.

According to the Louisiana Lottery, a Powerball ticket worth $150,000 was sold at Banks Meat Market on South Broad Street.

The mystery victor of the $560 million Powerball jackpot can remain anonymous, a judge ruled Monday, saying the New Hampshire woman's right to privacy outweighs public interests.

Lottery victor in New Hampshire fights for her right to remain anonymous; Molly Line reports from New Hampshire.

"She was jumping up and down", Shaheen said of his client's reaction to Temple's ruling.

Judge Charles Temple on Monday granted the woman anonymity and ruled that revealing her name would be an invasion of privacy, in part because lottery winners in general are subject to "repeated solicitation, harassment, and even violence", Temple wrote in his 16-page resolution.

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Still, the judge said, the winner's hometown, Merrimack, New Hampshire, would have to be disclosed. Following instructions from the New Hampshire Lottery Commission's website, Doe signed the back of her ticket with her name, phone number and address.

The woman's lawyers argued her privacy interests outweigh what the state said is the public's right to know who won the money in the nation's eighth-largest lottery jackpot.

"Although the Commission seemingly contends that these are isolated examples, there is evidence suggesting that Ms. Doe would also be subject to similar unwanted communication", Temple wrote. "She will be able to live her life normally".

"While we were expecting a different outcome and believed the State had a strong argument, we respect the court's decision", McIntyre said. She has already donated a combined US$250,000 to Girls Inc of New Hampshire, an empowerment group for girls, and three chapters of End 68 Hours of Hunger, which provides meals for school children during the weekends.

Last week she received just over $264m - her winnings minus taxes and bearing in mind winners get a smaller amount if they opt for a lump sum payment. It is the first of what her lawyers said would be donations over the years of between $25 million to $50 million during her lifetime.

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