Shoe memorial represents thousands of victims of U.S. gun violence

Nellie Chapman
March 14, 2018

It comes nearly a month after 17 people were killed in the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Some of the shoes being placed on the lawn are from some of the victims, according to Avaaz.

The memorial was set up by Avaaz, a group that mobilizes activists largely through online campaigns and petitions.

Some 7 thousand shoes, creating a temporary memorial- called "Monument For Our kids"- on the southeast lawn. Prominent celebrities, including Bette Midler and Chelsea Handler, helped publicize the drive via social media.

The event mirrors a similar display the group put on following the 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris ahead of the Global Climate Summit. Each pair represents a child who has been killed by gun violence in the US since the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports almost 13 hundred U.S. Children under the age of 17 are killed by guns every year. A sea of empty shoes also filled the grounds outside the Department of Health in 2016 to represent the millions of uninsured people who die each year from treatable conditions.

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The Capitol is the home of the U.S. Congress.

The walkout has won the support of many school districts and civil rights organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union.

President Donald Trump favored age limits on gun purchases and other restrictions immediately after the Florida shooting. Her pursuit of gun control all began in 2007, when she received a devastating phone call from her daughter, who was studying at Virginia Tech.

The silent protest is meant to spur lawmakers to take action on gun reforms.

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