El Chapo trial: Mexican drug lord GUILTY and will NEVER be released

Nellie Chapman
February 12, 2019

World's most infamous cartel boss Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman found guilty.

The 61-year-old was found guilty today by a NY court of operating the huge criminal enterprise and is expected to be given life in prison.

Over the course of two and a half months, a jury of eight women and four men in Brooklyn federal court heard testimony about unspeakable torture and ghastly murders, epic corruption at almost every level of Mexico's government, narco-mistresses and naked subterranean escapes, gold-plated AK-47s and monogrammed, diamond-encrusted pistols.

Convicted by a jury of eight women and four men, he could face life in a US maximum-security federal prison.

Guzman, 61, previously broke out of two Mexican prisons before he was captured and was extradited to the United States.

Guzman spoke in the courtroom only once during the trial, saying he would not testify in his own defense, NBC News reported.

Recaptured drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is escorted by soldiers at the hangar belonging to the office of the Attorney General in Mexico City, Mexico, on January 8, 2016.

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Jurors have reached a verdict in the case of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán, the Mexican druglord accused of carrying out a sprawling criminal enterprise as chief of the Sinaloa cartel.

Witnesses detailed assassinations and political payoffs, and how drugs were smuggled using tanker trucks, rail cars and even shipments of canned peppers.

Federal prosecutors say Guzman's Sinaloa cartel amassed billions of dollars importing tons of cocaine, heroin and marijuana into the U.S.

Likewise, the trial involved the twice-daily closing of the Brooklyn Bridge to ensure safe passage for the for the parade of government vehicles transporting El Chapo from the prison to the courthouse.

U.S. District Judge Brian Cogan lauded the jury's meticulous attention to detail and the "remarkable" approach it took toward deliberations.

The prosecution's case against Guzman, a roughly 5½-foot figure whose nickname translates to "Shorty", included the testimony of former associates and other witnesses.

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