Saudi Human Rights Commission: Suspects In Khashoggi's Death Brought To Justice

Nellie Chapman
March 15, 2019

Three dozen countries, including Turkey, called on Saudi Arabia last week to cooperate with a United Nations -led investigation into the murder of Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist and critic of the kingdom's rulership.

The red notices were issued on 1 March at the request of the Istanbul Prosecutor's Office, the Turkish media specified.

The Red Notice was reportedly issued for the former Saudi Deputy Intelligence Chief Ahmed al Asiri, and Saud al Qahtani, an advisor to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman.

Turkey urged Saudi Arabia to extradite the perpetrators of the crime, as well as to provide information on the location of Khashoggi's body.

On Thursday, Aiban said the suspects had faced three hearings so far in Saudi Arabia with their lawyers present. He gave no names or other details.

The Saudi public prosecutor's spokesman said late past year that 11 Saudis had been indicted and referred for trial over the case, with authorities seeking the death penalty for five.

It also criticized Aiban's rejection of any foreign investigation.

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Bandar Al-Aiban, who heads Saudi Arabia's human rights commission, stressed though that any calls to "internationalise" the investigation "amount to an interference in our domestic affairs".

Regarding Yemen's crisis, he said the Arab Coalition is committed to global human rights law.

The Saudi government has denied any involvement by the crown prince.

The UN has repeatedly called on Saudi Arabia to cooperate with an UN-led investigation into Khashoggi's murder, but the kingdom has refused, calling it an internal matter.

The killing has severely strained ties between Turkey and Saudi Arabia, although Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan has good ties with the Saudi monarch, King Salman.

Agnes Callamard, the UN's special rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, was in Turkey in late January to probe what happened to the journalist.

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